Sign up now!
Don't show this again

Thank you for confirming your subscription!

(And remember, if ever you want to change your email preferences or unsubscribe, just click on the links at the bottom of any email.)

We’re glad you’re enjoying Poultry Health Today.
Access is free but you’ll need to register to view more content.
Already registered? Sign In
Tap to download the app
X
Share
X

REPORTS

Collect articles and features into your own report to read later, print or share with others

Create a New Report

Favorites

Read Later

Create a new report

Report title (required) Brief description (optional)
CREATE
X
NEXT
POULTRY PORK
follow us


You must be logged in to edit your profile.

Favorites Read Later My Reports PHT Special Reports
Poultry Health Today is equipped with some amazing (and free) tools for organizing and sharing content, as well as creating your own magazines and special reports. To access them, please register today.
Sponsored by Zoetis

Sponsored By Zoetis

.
Featured Video Play Icon

False layer syndrome linked to early infectious bronchitis exposure

Research is increasingly linking false layer syndrome (FLS) to early exposure to infectious bronchitis virus (IBV).

FLS has been reported across the world over the past decade, but it has only relatively recently been discovered in North America.

The condition was first found in Canada, and cases started to pick up in 2017, according to Karen Grogan, DVM, MAM, ACPV, clinical associate professor of avian medicine at the University of Georgia’s Poultry Diagnostic and Research Center.

It slowly spread from Canada through the primary layer-producing areas in the US like Pennsylvania, the West Coast and the Midwest, before the first case was reported in Georgia in July 2019.

The condition prevents laying hens from producing eggs, but birds display few outward signs of ill health and develop ordinary combs.

“The birds look like they’re still in production,” Grogan told Poultry Health Today. “[I like to call them] freeloaders, meaning they’re eating off the feed, but they’re not laying any eggs.”

One sign that occasionally presents is a “penguin’s stance,” where birds’ abdomens are so filled with cystic oviducts that they stand upright and waddle when they walk.

In one case Grogan uncovered on a commercial caged farm, affected birds tended to sit toward the back of cages.

During post-mortems, left oviducts were found to be very large and filled with fluid, and were no longer active.

The bird’s ovary appeared normal with follicles developing. “Sometimes those get released, and you can see secondary peritonitis that will form because the yolk material goes into the abdomen,” Grogan said.

“But there’s not a lot of extra clinical signs except for this — it’s called cystic salpingitis. So that’s the main clinical finding that we see.”

It is believed that the condition is brought about following a very early exposure to an IBV — thought to be DMV/1639 in North America — potentially in the first week.

“That virus goes in and creates changes to the epithelium of the reproductive tract. And those changes are what we feel like we were able to show in adult affected layers,” Grogan said.

“But what we don’t know exactly is sort of what that timeline is, or when birds are actually infected, and then exactly when those pathological changes occur.”

Work is now underway to try and determine the exact pathogenesis. “We’re trying to figure out exactly how it happens,” she explained. “What we do understand is that this FLS is sort of an endpoint clinical sign.”

Grogan also highlighted the importance of taking good samples to aid diagnosis. “It really helps us to go to the barn to collect samples, so we can see for ourselves. So that’s the best.”

But if that’s not possible, taking as many samples as possible and preserving in formalin or freezing is sound advice. “That’s one thing I’ve learned.

“Yes, common things are common, and most of us are pretty good at figuring out the common things, but every now and then you get something that is a zebra. So take extra samples to catch the zebras.”

 

 

Share It
Research is increasingly linking false layer syndrome to early exposure to infectious bronchitis virus. The condition prevents laying hens from producing eggs, but birds display few outward signs of ill health and develop ordinary combs.

Click an icon to share this information with your industry contacts.



Posted on November 23, 2020

tags: , ,
RELATED NEWS



You must be logged in to edit your profile.

Google Translate is provided on this website as a reference tool. However, Poultry Health Today and its sponsor and affiliates do not guarantee in any way the accuracy of the translated content and are not responsible for any event resulting from the use of the translation provided by Google. By choosing a language other than English from the Google Translate menu, the user agrees to withhold all liability and/or damage that may occur to the user by depending on or using the translation by Google.